Singapore

  • The Government of Singapore has turned to blockchain to prevent traders from defrauding banks. This was driven by an incident where Standard Chartered lost nearly $200 million from a fraud in China’s Qingdao port two years ago. Fraudulent companies used duplicate invoices for the same goods to get hundreds of millions of dollars from banks, so the Singapore government developed a system with the local banks focused on preventing invoice fraud by having the blockchain create a unique cryptographic hash (a unique fingerprint) of every invoice. The banks share then, this unique key, rather than the raw data. If another bank tries to register an invoice with the same details, the system will be alerted.

 

  • The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) has successfully completed a proof-of-concept pilot to explore the use of blockchain for interbank payments. Partnering with a consortium of financial institutions, blockchain infrastructure was used to produce a digital currency issued by MAS and methods were tested to connect bank systems through distributed ledger technology. The technology will simplify the payment process, reduce time take for transactions, enhance transparency and system resilience and reduce the cost of long-term record keeping. MAS is currently developing links from Singapore to other countries to enable DLT cross-border payments, and will test blockchain technology for bond trading. MAS is looking at this project as the first step in leveraging Blockchain to verify and reconcile trade finance invoices, verify the performance of contracts, keep an audit trail and deter money laundering.