Restart Week West, A Decentralized Community Event of Innovation and Support for the Redevelopment of Puerto Rico, Returns This May

Restart Week West, A Decentralized Community Event of Innovation and Support for the Redevelopment of Puerto Rico, Returns This May

 

Following the successful debut edition of Restart Week in San Juan, Puerto Rico this past March, the community-driven event has announced its second gathering which will take place from May 11-19 in Mayagüez on the western coast of Puerto Rico.

With their second event, Restart Week will officially collaborate with the Municipality of Mayagüez and the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez to ensure direct impact on the local and surrounding community. Similar to local impact events in San Juan, independent groups and event organizers are planning events with the local community for Restart Week West.

Impact From Restart Week San Juan:

  • Deploying caravans of volunteers around the island to help with relief efforts
  • 400 pounds of art supplies delivered to the Boys and Girls Club
  • Solar project completed for five houses
  • Pallets of food delivered to Island Corps
  • A monumental day of relief efforts that helped turn the lights on in the old San Juan Children’s Museum for the first time in four years
  • “Power to the People” benefit concert from Lottery.com that was attended by thousands of people with performance from Akon, Yandel, Lupe Fiasco, Raekwon, Ghostface Killah and more.

 

With this move, a more intimate Restart Week West will integrate students and innovators with focused events, mentorships, thought-leaders, and collaborations. While there will be additional activities in Rincón and Aguadilla, most of the events will take place in Mayagüez, the largest city on the Western side of the island with more than 13,000 college students and over 10 universities in the municipality.

Mayagüez is the center for technology innovation on the island with more computer science graduatesthan anywhere else in Puerto Rico, and the city ranks first for engineering, lawyers, accountants and professionals. Restart Week is working with several local startups, entrepreneurs, and companies, along with students and professors from the Entrepreneurship Network at the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez, to bring resources and connections to advance the innovation and growth on the Island.

The first Restart Week was a week-long series of community-driven events anchored by three major blockchain conferences and a benefit concert. The week brought together a community of locals, new residents, and passionate visitors participating in the mission to support the restart, redesign, rebuild Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria.

The March edition brought in an estimated 2,500 attendees and over 3,000 participants that took part in D10e, Blockchain Unbound, and CoinAgenda, community organized events like Women in Blockchain, and local charity projects. To the delight of many local businesses, the first restart event led to all hotels from San Juan to Isla Verde selling out for the first time since Hurricane Maria.

Restart Week West will kick off with the EduBlock: Restart Week Hackathon from May 11-12, bringing data enthusiasts, innovators and students together to work on initiatives driving community empowerment and social impact. By doing this, Restart Week seeks to create real solutions to help the people of Puerto Rico. A key focus for Restart Week West will be specific inter-industry collaboration in areas such as energy, agriculture, healthcare, housing and education. There will also be complementary art and design activities and snacks for the children of Mayagüez, which will take place after school from May 11-18. More events can be found on the Restart Week website with more to be added soon.

Restart Week West is partnering with the Startup Societies Summit on May 8th-10th in Washington D.C, which will bring together a consortium of actors to rebuild Puerto Rico with sustainable startup cities. The consortium, headed by policymakers, blockchain entrepreneurs, resilient infrastructure experts and other leaders in innovation, will take steps to create communities for entrepreneurial collaboration.

The Official Media Partner for Restart Week West is The Confluence: A full-service, global media agency that delivers best-in-class publicity, branding and content strategy to many of the world’s most influential brands, launches and causes.

More information on Restart Week and several related initiatives will be announced in the upcoming weeks on the Restart Week website. Those interested in volunteering or submitting an event for Restart Week West as well as anyone that wants to join the Restart effort can do so on their official website.

STAY CONNECTED:
Website | Twitter

###
 

Blockchain for Humanity – Global Challenge

This is a Global challenge at United Nations Unite Ideas. You can find a link to submission form at the bottom of this page.
BACKGROUND

The World Identity Network (WIN), the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS), and the United Nations Office of Information and Communications Technology (UN-OICT) are partnering to launch a pilot initiative that will use the blockchain technology to help combat child trafficking in Moldova. A first in the world, this project is part of a broader effort titled “Blockchain For Humanity”, announced during the Blockchain Humanitarian Summit in New York, on November 10, 2017.

Still the poorest country in Europe, Moldova has been trying to stop child trafficking for decades. The Government of Moldova is an official partner in this Global Challenge, believing that this breakthrough technology can be leveraged beyond commercial applications, for the social good.

EXPECTED OUTCOME

The Global Challenge will result in a detailed concept and project design that could be further enhanced and used by the Government of Moldova for project implementation. However, the concept should be scalable and applicable to other contexts as well, including other countries around the world, where the prevalence of child trafficking is high.

RECOGNITION

The winner of the challenge will:

  • Be offered the opportunity to have an advisory role in the further development of the submitted solution.
  • Be featured at the United Nations Press, the Unite Ideas platform and more broadly in press and social media.
  • Be offered the opportunity to pitch the solution for potential investment from WIN and other interested organizations.

*Please note that the winner of the Global Challenge is not automatically guaranteed award of contract for project implementation, nor investment or grants from potential donors.

AUDIENCE

This challenge is open to the general public. Public, private, and academic organizations.

How can Blockchain Technology Be Used to Help Prevent Child Trafficking in Moldova?

The task is to propose a detailed project concept and functional design of the solution that would encompass the following sub-components:

ESTABLISHING A PERSONAL DIGITAL IDENTITY FOR CHILDREN

Undocumented children and minors can become an easy prey for human traffickers, who often use fake identification (ID) documents to transport them across borders. Once trafficked, these children and minors are sold to sex brothels, caught in modern slavery rings, and even used for the illegal human organ trade. Digital identity on the blockchain may offer a significantly higher chance of catching traffickers and securing data on an immutable ledger, further making any such trafficking attempts more traceable and preventable.
However, concerns over the privacy of the identity data stored should be identified and clarified, along with proposed ways of addressing them. The proposed solution should allow establishing a unique, secure, digital identity for children and minors aged 0-14 y/o (pilot size: approx. 350,000 children, with modalities of linking children’s personal identity to that of their family members.

SETTING UP A BLOCKCHAIN PLATFORM FOR THE INTEGRATED ID SYSTEM

Setting up a solution that would allow securing identity data on the blockchain, making an immutable record of the actual, or attempted exit with a minor without parents’ permission outside the borders of Moldova.

The integrated ID system may cover the total population (size: 3,500,000 people) or a subset of it, and the choice between these two options should be explained and justified. Issues such as “the right to be forgotten” and the self-sovereign control of data should also be addressed in the proposed solution.

AUTOMATING COMMUNICATION

Potential or actual victims of trafficking are often times isolated and lack support and help in critical circumstances. However, the traditional communication tools, such as direct contact with a social worker, for example, may not function in this context. Setting up a solution that would allow the use of artificial intelligence (AI) tools, for instance, could help recognize and detect patterns of behavior and automate communication with the victims.

EXPECTED DELIVERABLES

Your submission must include the following materials:

1. Detailed concept design and documentation describing the functionalities and explanation of the approach taken to solve the Challenge and the proposed solution.

2. Demonstration systems, prototypes, or videos illustrating the functionality described. (you must provide a link to the source code of any demonstration material you submit).

If you decide to submit a solution, you will do so by providing Internet links where your documentation, software, demos and any material will be stored, which shall be marked and accompanied by creative common and recognized open source software licenses, and shall be visible and accessible to the general public. You will be asked to accept the terms and conditions below:

SOLUTION TERMS AND CONDITIONS

When you submit a solution to this challenge you agree to license it as follows:
Documents, presentations, Infographics, databases and any other content are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license. Read the full text of the license here: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode

Software and hardware is licensed under a GNU General Public License Version 3 as published by the Free Software Foundation here: https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html or another license approved by the Open Source Initiative, see: https://opensource.org/licenses/alphabetical.

You represent and warrant that you have all necessary rights, licenses, and permissions to grant the above license and that the content submitted by you and the submission of such content, do not and will not violate any intellectual property rights (including but not limited to copyrights and trademark rights) of any third party.

CHALLENGE SPONSORING ORGANIZATIONS:

The Government of Moldova, UNOPS, UN-OICT, WIN.

CHALLENGE FOCAL POINTS:

Yoshiyuki Yamamoto, UNOPS
Jorge Martinez Navarrete, UN-OICT
Mariana Dahan, WIN
Mihail Beregoi, Government of Moldova

Post your preliminary idea today!

The last day for submissions is January 10, 2018

For any questions please contact us at : uniteideas@un.org

Making Blockchain Technology Work for Development: The Need for Data and Dialogue


24 JUL 2017


Cutting through the layers of hype surrounding blockchain technology is tough work. Underlying the buildup in excitement, however, is a remarkable tool that could, if designed and used appropriately, help improve processes related to several long-standing development challenges. In our new paper “Blockchain and Economic Development: Hype vs. Reality,” we examine the technology’s potential role in addressing four of those challenges:

  • making aid disbursement more secure and transparent;
  • facilitating faster and cheaper international payments;
  • providing a secure digital infrastructure for verifying identity; and
  • securing property rights.

We argue that, while blockchain-based solutions have the potential to increase efficiency and improve outcomes dramatically in some use cases and more marginally (if at all) in others, key constraints must be resolved before blockchain technology can meet its full potential in this space. Overcoming these constraints will require increased dialogue between the development and technology communities and a stronger commitment to collecting and sharing data about what’s working and what isn’t in pilot projects that use the technology. Read more.

The ULC’s model act for digital currency businesses has passed. Here’s why it’s good for Bitcoin.

The Uniform Law Commission has given states a clear path to approach this technology the right way.

The Uniform Law Commission, a private body of lawyers and legal academics from the several states, has just voted to finalize and approve a uniform model state law for the regulation of virtual currency businesses. This is great news for businesses, users, and developers of cryptocurrency and decentralized computing technologies. Read more.

Japan to Test Blockchain for Government Contract System

Japan is reportedly looking to integrate blockchain into its online systems for accepting government contract bids. 

According to Nikkei Asian Review, the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, who oversees the Japanese administrative system and manages local governments, will test a blockchain-based system for processing government tenders in the fiscal year starting from this April through March 2018.

In the tendering process, governments solicit bids for contracts from vendors, collecting a swath of information from those companies as they assess whom they’ll award projects. Japanese officials want to see if blockchain can help improve the efficiency of existing processes by using the tech to connect the government offices that possess the required information. In this case, blockchain would form part of that back-end system for sharing data between agencies, if implemented.

Japans’s government procurement market amounts to more than $600bn annually – an amount worth 16.2% of the country’s GDP, and 38.3% of its total public-sector expenditures – according to research from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

The focus on procurement forms part of a broader strategy to incorporate the tech in e-governemnt systems, according to Nikkei. Future plans are said to include sharing some of the findings of the trial with private-sector partners.

Japan isn’t alone in testing this use case area. As CoinDesk reported earlier this month, the US General Services Administration is seeking prototype proposals in a bid to see how blockchain could improve its contract review process for IT vendors.

Original: http://www.coindesk.com/japan-test-blockchain-government-contract-system/

The future of female tech leadership is thriving—in the United Arab Emirates

Japan looks to blockchains for more secure e-government systems

29 June 2017 NIKKEI Asian Review

Testing to begin this fiscal year with tender applications

Japan aims to incorporate blockchain technology into its e-government systems.

TOKYO — Japan wants to use the data storage technology behind bitcoin and similar virtual currencies to update how individuals and companies interact electronically with government, aiming to bolster information security while cutting administrative costs.

The Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications will test a blockchain-based system for processing government tenders in the fiscal year through March 2018. Next fiscal year, it plans to lay out a roadmap for incorporating distributed-ledger technology in e-government systems and begin moving in that direction.

Blockchains have drawn worldwide attention for their ability to create highly transparent and secure systems for such purposes as transferring money. Forging entries in a blockchain-based distributed ledger is extremely difficult, since data is shared by everyone in the system rather than stored in any single computer.

The centralized servers behind much of today’s IT systems require costly protection against cyberattacks, and the risk of data theft places limits on the types of information that can be shared with and within government, officials say.

The ministry envisions a blockchain-based system making tender applications easier for both the private sector and government. Instead of applicants collecting the tax payment certificates and other necessary documents from various government offices, for example, the agency issuing the tender would be able to gather the information electronically.

Further down the road, the Japanese government will consider sharing its blockchain-related know-how with the private sector. Some have suggested the use of blockchain technology in securing data involved with autonomous driving, power stations and other key infrastructure.

(Nikkei)

The original article is here.

 

US Government Organizes ‘Federal Blockchain Forum’ for July

The US government is set to host an inter-agency blockchain event next month.

Set for July 18th, the US Federal Blockchain Forum is being organized by the General Services Administration (GSA) and the State Department.

The goal, according to an announcement post from DigitalGov University (a federal staff training group), is to develop a six-month plan for “how agencies can collaborate to achieve our goals and support the creation of shared services for blockchain technology”. 

Both the GSA and the State Department, among other parts of the US government, have made public their work with blockchain, with the former recently seeking price quotes on an integration of the tech into its contract award process. The State Department revealed that it formed an internal working group focused on blockchain earlier this month.

The event is a notable one for the prospects of public-sector applications of the tech, as the event’s organizers hope to encourage officials that are attending to effectively start mapping out how blockchain could be applied for their specific purposes.

“In order to participate in the forum, agency teams must submit a potential use case for Blockchain technology in your mission,” the announcement reads.

Original: http://www.coindesk.com/us-government-organizes-federal-blockchain-forum-july/

US Government Seeks Blockchain Solutions for Contract Bidding System

Stan Higgins

The US government’s main logistical agency is looking at blockchain as a way to re-envision its contract review process. 

According to a request for quotation published on 19th June, the General Services Administration is looking for a contractor to help it assess how blockchain could be integrated into FAStlane, a system launched last year as part of a broader effort to streamline how smaller companies, especially IT firms, bid on government contracts. A request for quotation is a kind of solicitation for vendors, specifically for the estimated cost of delivering on a contract.

The agency said on its website:

“The purpose of this RFQ is to obtain contractor support to develop a proof of concept for DLT (Distributed Ledger Technology), automated machine learning technology, and/or artificial intelligence based exchange implementation into GSA’s Multiple Award Schedule (MAS) FAStlane new offer proposal review processes.”

According to supplemental documentation, the GSA would want any blockchain-related implementation “be cryptocurrency agnostic and not monetize mining” as well as be capable of supporting smart contracts.

Further, the system should constitute “a permissioned ledger that uses multiple cloud platforms for redundancy and high-availability and key management”.

The request closely follows statements from a GSA official who told a Washington, DC radio station that the agency is looking into how the technology can enhance the way it provides support to federal agencies.

The new release notably offers insight into at least one of the specific ways in which the agency might apply blockchain – in this case, the process by vendors can gain access to federal contracts. And although it’s a proof-of-concept pitch that might never see the light of day, the request highlights an early use case that is specific to the public sector.

The GSA said that its request is open to bids until 10th July.

Original: http://www.coindesk.com/us-government-blockchain-contract-bidding/

 

K(NO)W IDENTITY CONFERENCE 2017

K(NO)W IDENTITY CONFERENCE 2017, Washington D.C.

May 15 – 17, 2017

May 15, 2017
  • Opening Remarks and Keynote “Fireside” Chat with Edward Snowden
  • The Challenges of Big Data and Regulatory Compliance
  • Identity as a Pillar in the Global Development Agenda: Efforts to Date and Future Directions
  • Investing in Identity
  • Trends in Identity Management for the Modern Enterprise
  • The Business of Identity
  • Know Your Self
  • National Identity Schemes: Contrasting Different Approaches and Progress
  • Implementing Identity for All
  • Trusted Digital Identity Networks: A Journey Towards Self-Sovereign Identity
  • The [Unexpected] Business of Identity
  • International Regulation of Identification in Financial Services: Key Differences and Trends
  • Identity Verification: Demographic Challenges
  • Lessons Learned from Identity Verification in Emerging Markets
  • Who Owns Identity? A Conversation
  • But Can You Have It All? Re-inventing the Privacy, Security, and User Experience Tradeoff
  • Unlocking Value Through Attributes
  • Fireside Chat with Carmi Gillon: Identity and Security
May 16, 2017
  • Regulatory and Policy Options to Support Advances in Digital Identity
  • The New Ideas in Access Control – Physical and Information Security in our Connected World
  • Automate! Automate! Automate!
  • Dirty Money in a Digital World: Modernizing Approaches to KYC, AML and Terrorist Financing
  • Facilitating e-Commerce in a World Where Everyone is a Merchant
  • Creating Tiered Identity Models
  • Modern Multi Factor Authentication
  • Turning Risk and Compliance into a Competitive Advantage
  • Identity, Trust, User Experience, and the Sharing Economy
  • Personal Data: An Asset and a Liability
  • Identity Interoperability: Driving Collaboration and Standards
  • Identity on Blockchains
  • Trust Frameworks: Their Critical Role in Governing Identity Systems and Allocating Liability
  • Convenience, Security, and The Next Step for Biometrics
  • Payments in the Era of the Internet of Everything: Cracking the Identity Challenge
  • The Art and Science of Continuous Identity Verification
  • Breaking the Identity Theft to Fraud Cycle
  • Regulating Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Identity?
May 17, 2017
  • Identity and Democracy: A Look at Voter Registration
  • Remote Identity Proofing: Opportunities and the Road Ahead
  • The Next Step for Identity Professionals: De-weaponizing Identity Systems
  • Startup Pitch Stage: BBVA Open Talent Competition Finalists
  • The Personal Data Economy
  • An Invitation to the Relying Party
  • Startup Pitch Stage: BBVA Open Talent Competition Finalists
  • It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a Synthetic Identity!